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Health promotion and ill-health prevention

Main conclusions

 

(Please note this document was prepared in 2007)

 

  • The pharmacy’s counselling on smoking cessation, weight reduction and cholesterol do have an effect on health and well being
  • There is evidence that the pharmacy can influence smokers to stop smoking and people who are overweight to lose weight via counselling, education and support
  • A cost-effective analysis (CEA) of the pharmacy’s counselling in connection with smoking cessation shows that the programme is comparable to or better than other smoking cessation programmes
  • There is evidence of great satisfaction with screenings, health counselling and smoking cessation courses
  • There is evidence that pharmacy customers’ knowledge about health promotion and ill-health prevention increases with regard to cholesterol and osteoporosis in connection with general advice on healt
  • There is evidence that using interdisciplinary healthcare teams to instruct people with diabetes can initiate changes in behaviour that can lead to clinically significant changes
  • Changes in attitude have been shown in pharmacy customers as follows: they have a positive perception of the pharmacy’s activities and indicate they will use them again, and they would like more education from the pharmacy.
  • There is evidence that the pharmacy can initiate changes in behaviour in people after screening for risk factors for developing cardiovascular disease, osteoporosis and breast cancer
  • The pharmacy’s interventions in connection with secondary prevention activities have been shown to lead to increased or changed drug consumption
  • There is no evidence that the pharmacy can intervene with regard to patients’ drug-related problems.
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Full summary including references at the end of the summary 

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